A Letter to my Recent-Graduate Self

Dear Andrea,

Congrats on finally finishing your double bachelor’s degree in France! So… I’ve got some good and bad news for you. The good news is that your drive and thirst to discover the world will push you to move twice in one year. You will leave the old and cold French city of Lyon to a tiny tropical island on the other side of the world for an incredibly promising internship, to the modern, intercultural and fast-paced city of sunny Barcelona for a master’s degree.

The bad news, you ask? Well, your expectations are too high, and your priorities are all messed up. Working for one of the largest intergovernmental organizations in the Pacific islands and participating in United Nations and European Union-funded programs as an intern will not easily open the doors you expect to be opened with a breeze. Meeting renowned government officials and politicians doesn’t mean as much as you think it does. It doesn’t mean anything actually. But it’s OK, there are more important things in life.

Oh, and Barcelona? You know that dreamy inter-cultural European city with beaches and mountains where diversity means everyone is accepted? Well, that doesn’t exist, not exactly. Right now, you think globalization can only have a positive impact on society, but Barcelona will teach you otherwise. What was once a culturally rich city with its unique identity within Spain, filled with fishermen, Spanish guitars, old gothic cafés, and cheap yet quality Spanish tapas, is now being bombarded with Vegan Fast Food Bars with English-written menu’s, McDonald’s everywhere, and overpriced coffee shops with Americanized names and tacky decor. Life-long residents are being kicked out of their homes so that rich, foreign international businessmen can take over the city center. Gentrification everywhere. At first, you will love to walk and try to guess every language you hear on the street. But you will shortly start to crave hearing locals speak their native tongue, wondering where the hell this community’s identity has gone.

Now, I know you’re excited about the master’s program. And you should be! You’ll learn so much from it. But don’t get too hyped about it. Expecting a job from your social science studies… Well, that’s a bit of a stretch. Everyone has higher studies these days and speaks several languages, which frankly makes these attributes of yours less valuable to society. What actually counts is experience.

You will go through two heartbreaks in one year, although you haven’t experienced one since you were 17. So beware! And be careful. I know you have the right to go crazy after a heartbreak, but people are seriously willing to take advantage of emotionally unstable girls out there. But you’re a big girl, you’ll get through it. And you will live more within a year than you have in 7 years. You’ll feel like staying single forever to protect your heart. But you don’t decide how life goes. Life decides for you. And when you least expect it, you will fall in love again.

Oh, and by the way, a global pandemic is about to happen. And you will be quarantined away from your family and friends, with the guy you just met but will fall in love with.

My advice to you is: stop giving so much importance to your future, the role you think you want to fill, the box you think you want to fit into. Thinking big right now is going to tear you apart with stress and anxiety. Before thinking about your label, your title, and your accomplishments according to capitalism – prioritize your growth. Plant little seeds where your heart feels curiosity. Make time to foster new hobbies that will keep you company when no one is around. Stop intaking so much information, and produce something. Make something, anything! Dance, write, draw. Even if you’re bad at it, if it makes you happy, make time for it.

Stop worrying about your future because once you get the job you think you love, you will have much less time for yourself. We work to live, not live to work. So live, live, live. Think of your life and happiness day by day because all you got is this moment. Cherish the moment in life you are in because you won’t get it again.

Sincerely,

Your 2020 self

I Was 18 When a Man on the Street Punched me in the Face

What were you wearing?

What time was it?

Were you walking alone?

Where in the world was this?

These are some of the questions you might be asking yourself. And I will answer them right away. Yes, it was late at night. Yes, I was walking alone. Yes, I was wearing a skirt. Yes, I was in a foreign country. But no, none of this justifies an 18-year-old girl getting punched in the face by a stranger. 

It must have been my sixth week living in Lyon, France, where I chose to take a year off to learn French. I was at the bar with some people I had met in French class but I was frankly tired, not in the mood to party. I remember I had been talking to a French guy at the bar who was clearly interested in more than just talking. He insisted that he walk me home so that I wouldn’t have to walk alone. After all, it was 2 am and I was a young, clueless girl in a foreign country far away from my comfort zone. I kindly declined. You see, I didn’t want to have the responsibility of rejecting him after performing the chivalrous and dashing act of dropping me off. I didn’t want him to kiss me. I was tired. I just wanted to be home alone.

I left the bar tipsy, tired, and alone in my mini-skirt, at 2 am. As I got further from that one bright street at the heart of the city, the streets started getting darker. And emptier. And quieter. I thought I was walking alone until I heard a man shout from behind. I didn’t understand what he was saying since my capacity to speak French at this point was insignificant if not mythical, but the tone of his voice suggested he was screaming at someone. Possibly… Me? 

His voice became louder as his steps felt closer. I could feel him getting angrier. The sloppy-drunk-kind-of-angry that lacks in common sense and rationality. I started walking faster. I didn’t look back. I didn’t run. I just fastened my pace and looked straight ahead. He starts catching up, and a few seconds later, I feel him smack the back of my neck as he shouts again. Only this time, I understood one word: pute. My blood starts boiling as I become enraged and so I turn around, I look him straight in the eyes for the very first time, and insult him in Spanish, as I automatically do when I lose my temper. He screams back at me and, once again, I understood « pute », just before he proceeds to punch me in the face. Full fist. No remorse. 

I lose my sense of alertness as my body falls on the floor, from shock rather than force. I looked up at him from the ground. I was confused. Traumatized. I didn’t understand what had just happened and I certainly hadn’t expected it. After all, it was the very first time in my life getting punched in the face. So I started crying like a baby. The man yelled at me one last time in his unfamiliar language, uttering the word he very much loved, and the only one I understood in his vocabulary: pute. He spat on my face and walked away, leaving me there on the floor, crying alone in the dark. 

When people ask me for a short answer to why I got punched in the face, I give them the simple version: I ignored my harasser and attempted to run away.

It’s been seven years now, and to this day, I am still mad at myself. I am furious because I didn’t try to defend myself. Why didn’t I try to punch back? Why didn’t I scream from the top of my lungs? Why didn’t I just let the guy from the bar walk me home? Why did I walk home alone at that time of the night? Why did I wear that mini skirt? Why wasn’t I more careful? 

But I am awfully tired of having to justify that I got punched in the face – not because of all the things I did wrong or all the things I could have avoided – but because a drunk, angry, sexist man, a stalker, a harasser, felt like he had the right to insult me and punch me. Me, a girl who was just trying to get home. 

Did he want to punch me in the face because of the way I was dressed and thought I deserved to be treated like trash? Maybe. Did he want to punch me in the face because I ignored him and tried running away, making him feel rejected? Maybe. Did he want to punch me in the face because he had all this anger bottled up inside of him that he wanted to take out on someone smaller and weaker than him? Also maybe. Who knows? The only thing I know now is that no matter the decisions I made that night, no matter what I was wearing, the time I went home, deciding to walk alone, no matter what, getting punched in the face was certainly not what I deserved.  

This is a very small and ordinary story in comparison to all the heinous acts of gender violence around the world, from child marriage to sexual violence to psychological abuse to genital mutilation. This is merely my personal, first-hand experience (pun intended) of sexist aggression.  

The saddest part of it all is that within the following week, I started emptying my closet of all potentially considered sexy clothing I owned. I decided I would, from there on, wear more modest clothes and that maybe, there wouldn’t be a reason left for me to get harassed. I was completely wrong. But the positive outcome of this experience was that I immersed myself in feminist polemics, literature and started asking myself basic questions such as: why should we modify our behavior to avoid aggression? Walk fast, but don’t run. Be nice, but don’t smile. Dress well, but don’t show. Be wary, but don’t look.

I strive to live in a world where I can smile and sing on the street on the happiest of days, without having a guy telling me I’m charming. A world where I can drink from my Aquarius bottle without having a guy making phallocentric jokes about it. I strive to live in a world where I can safely walk home at night without getting harassed. A world in which we’re all on the same side, against violence, oppression and for freedom for all people. 

The Age of Disinformation and Polarization in the USA

United States politics has always been a game of Blue team vs. Red team, but the degree of polarization only started to become apparent to me when Donald Trump took office.  

With a larger land area than the sum of the 27 countries in the European Union, the sharp polarization within the USA comes as no surprise. It is one of the biggest, richest, and yet youngest countries in the world, only 244 years old.

My opinion of American politics in the age of information, or disinformation, is that the division seems to be increasing due to our digital echo chambers. Sites like 4chan, an anonymous forum where right-wing extremists and conspiracists love to spread hate and false information, or even Facebook and Instagram, can be used as harmful mystification machines by having false information and propaganda being spread by people who have no clue of politics or political theory but have extreme confidence that their opinions are correct. 

Ironically, in the age of information, we’re all living in our own narrative bubble, supported by our echo-chambers and amplified by the digital algorithms that show us what we like and validate our point of view. The people who share our echo chambers receive the same kind of information we do, and so we talk to them because they too, can validate our point of view. We’re smart, you see? We’re woke because we know the truth.

MEEP! False. You are not woke if you only talk to people who share your narrative bubble. As a matter of fact, you are quite the opposite. You are… slept. 

The country is already divided to such a degree that we need to have open conversations with people who have different views. Not only to understand the opposite side but maybe even teach someone a thing or two. We can’t forget that America is a haven for crazy uneducated people such as Creationists who reject science and the theory of evolution, Flat Earthers who believe the Earth is truly flat, QAnon conspiracists who believe the world is run by Satan-worshiping sex-trafficking pedophiles disguised as democratic politicians, and just plain ol’ racists. 

We need an educated population to make educated political decisions. And for this, we need to talk to each other and spread real information, facts, and examples of things we could be doing better. We need to inform ourselves and each other on the history of the world, geography, diverse cultures, examples of failed and successful policies and politics, and learn from these. When uneducated people tell us they are afraid of Biden because he’s a socialist, and in their heads, Socialism = Communism = Fidel Castro’s dictatorship, instead of giving up on that conversation, we should teach them about the reality of Biden being the most right-wing-leaning democratic candidate in the USA, about the theory of communism vs. the failed communist dictatorships in Latin America, and about all the successful socialist democracies that exist today such as France, Iceland, Portugal, the Netherlands, Italy.

The truth is that if you’re deleting people off Facebook and Instagram because they don’t share your political views, you’re not as woke as you think you are. Instead of seeing these people as ill-minded or cold-hearted, we should see them as uneducated people who just need a push and an open conversation with someone outside of their narrative bubble. So instead of pushing them away, let’s give them that educational push. 

Fighting Solitude and Abandonment Together

A reflection on my volunteer experience at Hope&Help.

Torn between the selfish caprice of wanting a pet, and the grounding sense of responsibility to abstain myself from getting one until my life gained some stability, I decided to look into other options to surround myself with little furry beings. 

I found Hope&Help, an organization dedicated to helping both little furries and their human friends. In other words, an NGO for social services and animal welfare. Their goal is a beautiful one: preventing solitude and abandonment by helping people at risk of social exclusion to take care of their pets when they are unable to do so. This way, whether you are a 92-year-old man in a wheelchair, a 50-year-old person who’s life has been a constant struggle against mental illness, or a 70-year-old woman who has been recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, you can still keep your best friend. 

I often think of how lucky I am to have people I love, and people who love me, even if they’re not always around.

Yes, my mom and my little sister live in Miami, my dad and my older sister live in Madrid, the rest of my family is spread out around Colombia, and my best friends are in Los Angeles, Orlando, Texas, Miami, Amsterdam, Madrid, Mexico… It feels a bit lonely, moving to new cities where I’m constantly meeting new people and getting further away from my core network, my backbone, my roots. But then I think of all the people who, for many reasons, are spending their days completely alone, with a life so voided of emotional support, so quiet, so lonely. No partner to come home to after being away, no sister to cry to when you’re in pain, no friends to hang out with on a sunny day. 

Some people, especially those who struggle with mental illness, could never even contemplate these possibilities. Their world is too foreign, too detached, and too big to be compatible with social skills and activities. Others are simply unable to do so in a conventional manner because of their disabilities, such as people who are deaf-mute. However, in my opinion, the most common type of lonely person today is the elderly person. This person might be someone who’s had a wonderful life. Perhaps they fell in love, got married, and had beautiful children. But then the children grew up, they left, and while they started to create a life of their own, the elder’s life begins to slowly vanish. Their life-partner passes away, and they are left all alone. Unfortunately, the response to many of these cases is placing the person in a nursing home, even if they can still take care of themselves. But the “lucky” ones who can still live on their own at least for a little bit longer, often live a lonely life.

While some of them love being away from people, and others long for the presence of another human being, most of them share the common desire of enjoying the company of a little furry friend. 

So here I am, with 294+ other volunteers in the city of Barcelona, trying to help lonely people at risk of social exclusion to keep their pets whether they’re able to take care of them or not. If you’re an animal lover, you may think the organization’s values and priorities are questionable. Doesn’t a dog deserve to live in a large space, with a physically active and clear-minded person? The answer is yes. But the reality is much more complex.

Most of these people have been taking care of their animal friend for a long time, and have just recently lost some kind of capacity. Whether they were recently diagnosed with vertigo, Alzheimer’s, or are simply terrified of leaving their house in the middle of a pandemic, the person’s relationship with their pet has been solid and loving for many years before suddenly becoming unable to taking care of their furry friend.

What’s the choice? Would impounding the pets, letting them spend the rest of their lives alone in a cage, barking for a human friend be a better option?  I don’t think so.